Business Use Case 1: Late Payments

I consulted with my friend who was able to get ‘seed capital’ from an ‘incubator’ for his small startup, which then built a social web app for young people and university students to prepare themselves for the real world. I explained to him I was on the same boat he was while he was developing his app by himself.

 

His most useful advice was to make the app work first and not wait for funds to get it started. Of course this is close to impossible, since its technical aspects, which seem doable on paper, are extremely complicated, especially since the system is supposed to be decentralized, distributed, and scaleable.

 

Ruby, or Not Ruby. That Is The Question

Ideally, the entire system should be built on Java. But Java is also quite difficult for amateur programmers. .NET is also out of the question since it requires Microsoft stuff and Microsoft is evil a monopoly, proven by Bill Gates’ being the richest man. PHP is a viable alternative, but which framework to use? So for now, I am left with Ruby because its Gem and ActiveRecord systems are much easier than Java’s Maven and Hibernate, despite its awful performance and non-scalability.

Despite Ruby’s ease, the system will still be extremely complex. To tackle the complexity, and to more properly plan the system, I’ve made business use-cases as a guide.

 

Business Use-Case 1

Use cases tell what a user does on the system, while a business use-case tells what users can achieve from the system.

 

NARA Use 1- Late Payment

NARA Use 1- Late Payment (1)

NARA Use 1- Late Payment (2)

NARA Use 1- Late Payment (3)

NARA Use 1- Late Payment (4)

NARA Use 1- Late Payment (5)

NARA Use 1- Late Payment (6)

NARA Use 1- Late Payment (7)

NARA Use 1- Late Payment (8)

NARA Use 1- Late Payment (9)

NARA Use 1- Late Payment (10)

 

That’s just one business case: addressing the sudden shortage of money, which I’ve observed to be very common both in small and big businesses alike. There are other business cases such as disaster relief, which Smith talks about in Book 4 of The Wealth of Nations, which will be explained in future posts.

 

 

 

 

 

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